Archive for the ‘Expert Perspective – Organization Development’ Category

RSS for Category ‘Expert Perspective – Organization Development‘

The Science and Art of Executive Coaching

by  

3 Comments | Share/Save

A practical and realistic approach to effective coaching for senior managers and leaders in your organization is available to you. Whether you are considering one to one coaching for yourself, a valued contributor, or are interested in building an internal coaching group “The Science and Art of Executive Coaching“ is worth a look.

There can be a clear line of sight from Organization Development to Leadership Development to Executive (or high level) Coaching. My Six Step Model to Executive Coaching has led to many successful coaching outcomes. It integrates the science and the art of coaching into a powerful and effective approach.

Click here to read more about my Six Step Model.

Whether it is individual coaching or the enhancement of coaching skills within an organization, The Science and Art of Executive Coaching is a proven and successful methodology offered by Grahall.

And for more information check out my videos at:

Introduction to The Science and Art of Executive Coaching
The Science and Art of Executive Coaching Part 1
The Science and Art of Executive Coaching Part 2

Filed under: Expert Perspective - Leadership Development, Expert Perspective - Organization Development



Determining the Level of Employee Engagement is Only the First Step….

by  

No Comments | Share/Save

An April 2, 2013 article in Forbes by Susan Adams surfaced a study by Leadership IQ that found that “More than a third of companies are so dysfunctional, the best people don’t really care about what they’re doing and the worst people don’t know that they are doing a lousy job…. Companies should be worried about these findings… because high performers tend to thrive on feeling involved and challenged.”

Wow, 42%!   That sounds like a big number, but since we don’t know the nature of the sample, other than that “leadership IQ’s research base includes thousands of companies and their employees” it is hard to tell how broadly these results should be applied.
Continue reading “Determining the Level of Employee Engagement is Only the First Step….” »

Filed under: Expert Perspective - Organization Development



The Right Track

by  

No Comments | Share/Save

In the face of all the recessions since 1980, employment numbers have simply not bounced back to where there were previously. We need to face the fact that certain jobs are not coming back. Whether they have been sent overseas to cheaper workforces or they have been automated, some positions, most of them less skilled, are gone forever. But it’s not just jobs like cashiers and bank tellers that have been automated or manufacturing jobs that have gone overseas, it is lots and lots of middle level management positions at large companies that have disappeared as well. While this is not good for many Americans, it may be good for business.
Continue reading “The Right Track” »

Filed under: Expert Perspective - Organization Development



Is Talent Diversity a Business Strategy?

by  

No Comments | Share/Save

Expert Perspective from Grahall’s OmniMedia Editorial Board

Our editorial board mulled over a February 20, 2012 article written by Gail Johnson (Bombardier: Giving women wings)where she quotes  Elisabeth Bussé, (director of leadership development and talent management at the Dorval, Que.-based organization, a division of Montreal’s Bombardier Inc. BBD.B-T) as saying: “Increasing diversity is a business strategy: We want our employees to be representative of the community in which we do business.”

Johnson adds: “Women have made up two-thirds of the recent growth in the Canadian work force, climbing from 35 per cent in the 1970s to 50 per cent in 2005…”

For most women in the business world, these are facts and sentiments they have heard before, for decades.
Continue reading “Is Talent Diversity a Business Strategy?” »

Filed under: Expert Perspective - Organization Development



Boards’ New Mantra: Communicate

by  

No Comments | Share/Save

Expert Perspective by Grahall’s OmniMedia Editorial Board

Joann Lublin wrote a very interesting article for the Wall Street Journal recently, titled Season of Shareholder Angst: U.S. businesses are bracing for a noisy proxy-voting season this year, although we think the anxiety may be felt more fiercely by board members than by shareholders.  In her article, Ms. Lublin covers a variety of topics weighing heavily on the minds of boards and shareholders alike, including say on pay, political contributions, succession planning, board elections and environmental concerns. 

Say on pay has been in the headlines for years. It was a campaign issue in the 2008 presidential elections and we have been discussing this subject in our blogs for that long as well.  The Dodd Frank Act mandated that all public filers hold “say on pay” votes in 2011, so this proxy season has companies scrambling to make recommendations to shareholders on the frequency of these votes. 
Continue reading “Boards’ New Mantra: Communicate” »

Filed under: Expert Perspective - Organization Development, Expert Perspective - Rewards



Executive Coaching: How to Make Great People Even Better

by  

No Comments | Share/Save

Expert Perspective From Grahall’s OmniMedia Editorial Board

Searching for interesting articles to discuss with the Editorial Board we came across one penned by Mark Jaffe last August (Freelancing ‘Til You Drop) where Jaffe writes: “When did every living executive get diagnosed as being in critical need of coaching?…. And how did all these dysfunctional leaders manage to fool so many people for so long? How were they able to last as much as fifteen minutes given the extreme darkness that surrounds them as they stumble cluelessly through their surrealistic dream worlds?”

Well as “President of Wyatt & Jaffe, [where] Mark Jaffe has been called one of the ‘World’s 100 Most Influential Headhunters’ by BusinessWeek magazine” we wonder if he might not hold a bias against coaching.  Perhaps he is concerned if execs get coaching they will be less likely to be replaced, limiting searches.  Or maybe he is concerned that execs need for coaching reflects poorly on recruiters who are expected to offer up the most effective execs to their clients.

Regardless, let’s take a more expansive look at coaching.
Continue reading “Executive Coaching: How to Make Great People Even Better” »

Filed under: Expert Perspective - Organization Development



Competency Models Must Support Creatively and Innovation (among other things)

by  

No Comments | Share/Save

Expert Perspective from Grahall’s OmniMedia Editorial Board

We enjoyed and for the most part agree with the recent blog in Forbes by Chunka Mui “Are the People in Your Organization Too Smart to be Creative?”  It may seem incongruous that scholarly research “in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology by Jennifer Mueller, Jack Goncalo, and Dishan Kamdar found that open expression of creative ideas was negatively correlated with perceptions of leadership potential” while studies of CEO’s by PWC found that “…innovation was a key focal point.”  IBM found that creativity was “…the most important leadership quality”.  

What that shows is that CEO’s either 1) don’t know themselves or their biases very well, or 2) their definitions of creativity and innovation differ for themselves and their possible successors.  CEOs may hold the belief that “my type of creativity and innovation is ‘good’ and yours is ‘bad’”.  Let’s face it, it’s very hard to see oneself objectively, perhaps especially if you are a hard driving, effective CEO. 
Continue reading “Competency Models Must Support Creatively and Innovation (among other things)” »

Filed under: Expert Perspective - Organization Development



Identifying Candidates Who Fit In With Your Company’s Culture

by  

No Comments | Share/Save

Expert Perspective from Grahall’s OmniMedia Editorial Board

We enjoyed reading and discussing Adam Bryant’s interview with Michael Lebowitz, founder and C.E.O. of Big Spaceship, (Hey, Rock Stars: Take Your Show Someplace Else  in the January 30, 2011 issue of the New York Times.

Bryant quotes Lebowitz as saying: “Don’t hire jerks, no matter how talented…  The second- or third- or fourth-best candidate who isn’t a jerk is going to ultimately provide way more value.”

We understand what he is saying: someone may be technically very highly qualified but if the individual’s personal or leadership style doesn’t fit with the company culture, then he or she likely will not be the best candidate. 
Continue reading “Identifying Candidates Who Fit In With Your Company’s Culture” »

Filed under: Expert Perspective - Organization Development



The New Year’s Resolutions HR Should Have Made (Note: there is still time!)

by  

No Comments | Share/Save

Expert Perspective from Grahall’s OmniMedia Editorial Board

Of course, we are technically three weeks into the New Year, but there is still time to take stock of your HR plans and consider what steps you can take to make the most of the opportunities for and dodge the threats to your valuable human resource assets.

We can’t predict the future and many would say there are plenty of unknowns about the employment market for 2011, but one thing is for sure, the US is slowly recovering.  According to a January 14, 2011 article by Economics Writer Jeannine Averaa, published on Yahoo (Industrial production rises by most in 5 months) “Overall industrial activity has risen 11 percent since hitting its recession low in June 2009. But it is still 6 percent below its peak reached in September 2007.”   The article continues, quoting Jeffrey Lacker, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, saying: “recent economic activity suggests the economic recovery is through its soft patch… [with] stronger growth this year, between 3.5 percent and 4 percent.”

Ron Scherer, staff writer for the CS Monitor writes in his January 7, 2011 article (Unemployment rate drops to 9.4 percent, but little cheer in jobless report) “The US economy finished 2010 with only lukewarm job gains [and]…  the unemployment rate fell from 9.8 percent to 9.4 percent – its lowest level since May 2009, which partially reflects fewer people actively looking for work.”

Discouragement on the part of job seekers isn’t surprising since, according to the article: “From the start of the recession in December 2007 to its end in June 2009, the US economy lost between 6 million and 8 million jobs. In 2010, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the economy gained only 700,000 jobs back after not adding any jobs in 2009.”

So what does economic recovery with stubborn unemployment mean for HR? Simply that your BEST employees remain key targets for recruiters.   If you haven’t taken the necessary step yet to retain these individuals, you must get started, NOW.  They first fundamental step in the process, which is often overlooked, is to determine which positions and which people are key to your company’s success.  As we said on our blog When the Going Gets Tough Keep the Best From Going , first identify the key roles and those people who contribute most to the bottom line, then create the infrastructure that supports, develops, nurtures and appropriately compensates these individuals.

High unemployment coupled with the fact that many companies have had to rein in incentive program, raises, and bonuses in order to survive give recovering and growing companies the opportunity to upgrade talent without over spending. At the same time a company identifies its key positions, it must determine if the individuals holding those positions are top talent.  If not, this jobs market can offer the chance to improve key talent in critical positions while controlling compensation and recruitment costs.
Continue reading “The New Year’s Resolutions HR Should Have Made (Note: there is still time!)” »

Filed under: Expert Perspective - Organization Development



Leading From the Top

by  

No Comments | Share/Save

Expert Perspective by Grahall’s OmniMedia Editorial Board

Rory Cellan-Jones’ November 14, 2010 article for the BBC (Can brain scans tell us who makes a good chief executive? Brain scans could reveal leadership ability) got our editorial board thinking about what we have seen as important characteristics of effective leaders.  Cellan-Jones writes: “Neuroscientists and psychologists believe they can make a real contribution to our understanding of what makes leaders tick.”   So until advanced technologies can scan a baby’s brain at birth and let us know if he or she will be a leader or a follower, here are a few things to consider:

1) Leadership is highly situational and cannot be defined in a limited way.  Like an animate organism, a company goes through a lifecycle that bring changes. From start up to decline and all the steps in between, the company’s leaders will help to dictate continued success (or failure).  The characteristics of the individual who will effectively lead a start-up differ from the characteristics of the individual who will effectively lead a mature organization. If the leader does not evolve and develop the skills necessary to address the company’s changing needs, the company will suffer. 

2) Even within those broad strokes of life cycles, the culture of the company can dictate the characteristics necessary for a leader’s success.  Take for example the New York Jets and the New England Patriots. Both are very successful, mature franchises, but their cultures and the style of their leaders (coaches and quarterbacks) could hardly be more different.

 The danger, of course, in determining the characteristics of “good leaders” and applying that with advanced technologies to single out a privileged group of individuals is that it probably won’t work, in part for the reasons discussed above, and in part for two other very critical reasons. 

There is a lot of luck associated with the identification and assent of leaders.  Warren Buffet himself said that his success is fundamentally based on the time and place he was born and raised.   Will the individual with the greatest potential for leadership always be identified?  Absolutely not.  And applying expensive technologies to help determine the best leaders will reinforce an already inequitable system.

Last but not least, the criteria used to identify leaders will be based on the group of leaders in place today.  Will those characteristics be right for the rapidly evolving companies of tomorrow?  Or will reinforcing the “status quo” of leadership characteristics impair the ability of companies to compete in the new and different economies we will face in the future?

As we said on our blog “In His Own Image: How Competency Models Compel Uniformity” recognizing and assessing important and unique talents and capabilities in potential leaders may be difficult for those whose personal and leadership styles provided the basis for existing competency models.  But, competitive advantage does not come from leaving unrecognized leadership talent on the table.

Contact Grahall’s Omni Media Editorial Board at edie.kingston@grahall.com

Filed under: Expert Perspective - Organization Development