Posts Tagged ‘Job Postings’

The Right Track

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In the face of all the recessions since 1980, employment numbers have simply not bounced back to where there were previously. We need to face the fact that certain jobs are not coming back. Whether they have been sent overseas to cheaper workforces or they have been automated, some positions, most of them less skilled, are gone forever. But it’s not just jobs like cashiers and bank tellers that have been automated or manufacturing jobs that have gone overseas, it is lots and lots of middle level management positions at large companies that have disappeared as well. While this is not good for many Americans, it may be good for business.
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Filed under: Expert Perspective - Organization Development



Get Going Whether Times are Tough or Not: Manage Headcount Regardless of the Economy

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Expert Perspective from Grahall’s OmniMedia Editorial Board

The Great Recession, Economic Recession, Economic Crisis, or whatever you want to call it has (as Robert Samuelson said in an article for the Washington Post: The Great Recession’s Stranglehold)  “…changed American psychology, politically, economically and socially.”  Not only have individual psyches been impacted, but also the “functioning psyche” of companies changed as a result of the dramatic and persistent downturn.     These changes will certainly be long term and very possibly permanent. 

Many companies have weathered the challenges of the economic downturn by focusing on the bottom line: carefully evaluating expenditures to ensure the greatest ROI, outsourcing and off shoring non-essential services, reducing headcount and utilizing contingent and temporary workers.  These adjustments have helped many companies stabilize and even increase profits in these difficult times.    The question remains why did it take the most significant financial crisis of the past 70 years to get companies to take these logical steps? 
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Filed under: Expert Perspective - Organization Development



Don’t Get In a Twist About Human Capital Turnover

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Expert Perspective Form Grahall’s OmniMedia Editorial Board

Jon Picoult made some sensible points in his recent article published in the New York Times (Here Comes a Turnover Storm) but in a few important ways he missed the boat.  No doubt there will be turnover when the job market picks up and perhaps most of that is due to employee discontent. But more importantly, before people  begin leaving (because they always do), a company should design its reward and retention programs to hold onto those, frankly, very few, who are the most important to the company. These few, in most cases not more than 15% of the workforce, are those individuals who contribute to the competitive advantage the company offers. 
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Filed under: Expert Perspective - Rewards



Seven Careers? We Agree: That’s just nonsense

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Expert Perspective by Grahall’s OmniMedia Editorial Board

In his September 4, 2010 article for Wall Street Journal (Seven Careers in a Lifetime? Think Twice, Researchers Say Carl Bialik sensibly questions: “Do Americans really go through careers like they do cars or refrigerators?”

Likely high school and college students asking the question “Fries with that?” do not consider that job, however well paying, to be a career,  And when these same individuals complete their education and go on to be an investment banker they wouldn’t think of the move from “burger flipper” to investment banker as a “career change” .  A job change, yes, a career change, NO.

Likewise the executive compensation consultant who has toiled for some years at Firm A and is recruited to Firm B to do similar work in a new environment (probably with more pay) would also not likely see that as a career change.  A job change, yes, a career change, NO.

So, is the question of career change even really relevant?  We think the confusion over the term “career change” vs. “job change” vs. “whatever ever else people are doing” may be nothing more than an issue of semantics. But the fact that Americans move around with some frequency is relevant to both employees and employers.   
 
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Our Notions on Investing – Getting a Little Banged Up?

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Expert Perspective by Grahall’s OmniMedia Editorial Board
 
Graham Browley writes in his August 21, 2010 article for the New York Times
(In Striking Shift, Small Investors Flee Stock Market) that  “The notion that stocks tend to be safe and profitable investments over time seems to have been dented in much the same way that a decline in home values and in job stability the last few years has altered Americans’ sense of financial security.” 

This recession has been unusually deep, with unemployment remaining stubbornly high as companies lay off workers and jobs move overseas to cheaper labor markets.  It’s not your “grandmother’s recession” (of the 1960s) or even your “mother’s recession” (of the 1980’s) for that matter.   In this one, the marked difference is that, from the late 1980s on, more and more Americans became investors in the stock market through their 401(k) plans. 
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It’s Not Just Executive Search, it’s Executive FIND

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Expert Perspective by Grahall’s OmniMedia Editorial Board

In her August 3rd article for SHRM (Executive Search Heats Up in Emerging Markets), Stephanie Overman writes: “Executive search experts see their business heating up in emerging markets, particularly in the Asia-Pacific area and Brazil.”

Here in the US things are a bit different.  With the economy still struggling to recover in many sectors and geographies, recruiting professionals can be faced with sifting through hundreds or even thousands of resumes for every job posting.   “Using electronic media and social networking” as Overman writes, might work where demand is greater than supply. But for US companies the need for experienced executive search firms remains critical, regardless of how appealing these “no or low” cost options might sound.  
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U.S. economy took a dive in the 2000s, a lost decade for workers

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Published in The Wall Street Journal, January 1, 2010 by Neil Irwin

For most of the past 70 years, the U.S. economy has grown at a steady clip, generating perpetually higher incomes and wealth for American households. But since 2000, the story is starkly different.
The past decade was the worst for the U.S. economy in modern times, a sharp reversal from a long period of prosperity that is leading economists and policymakers to fundamentally rethink the underpinnings of the nation’s growth.
It was, according to a wide range of data, a lost decade for American workers. A decade that began in a moment of triumphalism and the idea among some economists that recessions were a thing of the past has included two of them — bookends to a debt-driven expansion that was neither robust nor sustainable.

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Filed under: Newsfeeds



Employee Negativity Grows with Recession Fatigue

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Published in Society for Human Resource Management, December 18, 2009 by Kathy Gurchiek 

The cut-to-the-bone mentality of organizations trying to weather a lingering recession has taken its toll on employees’ perception of long-term career opportunities at those companies, according to a report released Dec. 15, 2009.
The negativity stems from being worn down by the recession, the survey says. That pessimism also is prompting workers to view their leaders in a less-than-rosy light, according to findings from Towers Perrin’s Quarterly Workplace Watch. Data is from about 640,000 people working at 54 companies around the world from July-September 2009.
A key question for organizations as the economy starts to recover is whether the changes organizations made during the recession are temporary or permanent, according to the survey report.

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Planned 2.5% Pay Increase Lowest in Last Decade, Study Finds

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Published in World at Work, December 9, 2009

U.S. employees can expect median pay increases of 2.5% in 2010, which is the lowest planned increase in the last decade, according to a new study.
The study by Hay Group found that this amount is one-half of 1% lower than when Hay Group conducted a similar study in July 2009 that forecasted a 2010 median pay budget increase of 3%.
Planned increases are generally consistent for executives, middle management, supervisory and clerical positions. After factoring in the consumer price index growth forecast for 2010 at 1.8%, the result is a ‘real’ gain of 0.7%.
“While these increases are greater than the 1.9% that employees actually received in 2009, the market is still tempering its outlook for 2010 as is evident by the swing from 3% increase budgets in the summer to 2.5% increases today. About a quarter of organizations decreased their salary budget increase estimates in the last four months,” said Mel Stark, vice president in the reward practice at Hay Group. “There are several things at play here,” Stark said. “Many organizations put the brakes on salary increases in 2009 and a number of organizations had salary freezes due to tough economic conditions and company performance. The improved outlook for salary increases is due to both a more positive economic outlook as well as a feeling by management that it is difficult to provide nominal increases to organization workforces who have been asked to do more with less during difficult times.”

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Employers Plan to Remain Conservative on Hiring in 2010

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Published in World at Work December 7, 2009
Despite signs of economic recovery, many employers plan to maintain a conservative stance well into 2010, with 31% of those polled in a recent Towers Perrin survey indicating they plan to reduce head count on a targeted basis in the coming year and another 6% planning for a significant reduction in staff.
The results of the new survey are improved over 2009 reports (42% and 35%, respectively), yet they reflect a continued level of concern among America’s businesses on the speed of recovery from the recent recession. In contrast to this projected employment contraction, 21% of the companies surveyed actually plan to increase hiring in the coming year, compared with just 3% that did so in 2009. In addition, 16% of companies that froze or reduced hiring in 2009 are planning to increase hiring next year. At the same time, companies are also expressing increased concern about keeping their critical talent as the recovery picks up steam and jobs become more available to top performers.

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