Posts Tagged ‘change management’

Organization Design for Business in the New VUCA Economy

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Your goal is to achieve competitive advantage. But is your company doing everything it can to succeed in this VUCA (Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous) economy? Are you sure? Tim McConnell shares how organizational design can be a powerful tool for improving performance.


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The 7 Steps to Successful Projects

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patton #1Charles Patton’s September article for PSX: People Strategy Exchange examines how thoroughly explaining why a project is being undertaken instills a sense of confidence that the decision to proceed was thoughtful, priorities were considered, fits for the organization, a plan is in place, the time, effort and expense costs have been considered and the cost: benefit ratio points to a successful outcome. All these are necessary to successful outcomes.
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Top Down | Bottom Up | Middle Out

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In his September article for PSX: People Strategy Exchange eMagazine, Marvin Smith of Deliberate Synergy explains why it takes more than just agreement to make large scale change happen.  Marvin Smith shares insights about top down, bottom up and middle out leadership, and how they are all necessary to ensure the success of large scale change projects.


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The 80 20 rule revisited

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Expert Perspective by Grahall’s OmniMedia Editorial Board

For the “change agents” in any organization, Geoff Carss’s recent article How Successful Are You at Change? might be pretty depressing.  He writes: “The success rate for business change has not materially improved for 20 years in spite of increasing investment in management training and development… Only 18% of the changes … were successful.”

It has long been known that the human animal is resistant to change.  We seek equilibrium both biologically and emotionally.  But change management experts have found that creating a foundation of employee engagement reinforced with continual communication are keys to promoting successful change efforts. 

As we explained on our blog The Only Thing Constant is Change, a company needs first to determine it’s approach to change.  As we see it,  there are at least 4 different distinct approaches a company can take to deal with change:

1) understand and react to change
2) proactively manage change
3) predict and utilize change
4) create and exploit change

Whatever the approach to change, the outcome must include an assessment of the impact of change on the company’s business strategy, followed by a review of organizational capabilities in light of change, and a realignment of talent management strategies to ensure a better long-term result.”

But these alone may not guarantee success in a change effort.  Many organizations fail to evaluate all the drivers of change – one of the biggest being its compensation programs.  Compensation programs can deliver a hefty boost to any change effort, provided that the rewards are aligned with the goals.  Usually, “yesterday’s” compensation program won’t support “tomorrow’s” change effort. 

There is a proverb that says “When the music changes, so must the dance”.  Change initiatives need to inform and be supported your reward strategy.

For more on how to be successful at change, check out our other blogs including Competent to the Core.

Contact Grahall’s Omni Media Editorial Board at edie.kingston@grahall.com

Filed under: Expert Perspective - Organization Development



The Only Constant Thing is Change

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Expert Perspective by Grahall’s OmniMedia Editorial Board

In his April 23, 2010 article Organizational Development & Change  Matt Pytosh says he finds “…Change Management to be over used and the new buzz phrase… Organization development (OD) isn’t as catchy. OD is broader and more comprehensive though, and places more value on the humanistic approach versus the economic approach of change management.”

Although we found Pytosh’s article to be a bit of an exercise in taxonomy – simply an attempt to classify various terms in hierarchical structure – we did think it was a good platform for a discussion of how companies approach change and change management.

Clearly a key organizational competency required in today’s world required of companies in every industry and geography is the ability to adroitly address change.  However, one size does not fit all – the approach a company takes to change management should be based upon the company’s business strategy and organizational structure.

We see there being at least 4 different distinct approaches a company can take to deal with change:

1) understand and react to change
2) proactively manage change
3) predict and utilize change
4) create and exploit change

Whatever the approach to change, the outcome must include an assessment of the impact of change on the company’s business strategy, followed by a review of organizational capabilities in light of change, and a realignment of talent management strategies to ensure a better long-term result.

Continually measuring the impact of change on the company’s business strategy helps companies to create an appropriate organizational reaction that might demand a change to the business strategy itself, or require fine-tuning to knowledge management, decision making, communication, talent management,  or a host of other organizational processes and protocols. 

With today’s environment changing more rapidly than ever before, it is important to have a resource of experienced consultants who can work cooperatively with an organization’s management team to identify, understand, interpret, and constructively and positively evolve the organization to not only survive change but take advantage of it.

Contact Grahall, we can help you.

Contact Grahall’s OmniMedia Editorial Board at edie.kignston@grahall.com

Filed under: Expert Perspective - Organization Development